Tuesday, October 11, 2011

Some of the amaranth is about 5 feet tall


purple


golden
and pink

I jumped the gun a bit and had to harvest some to clean and to taste . It was a little difficult to clean being rather green. Have to wait until the first frost nips and it falls more easily. It makes a nice porridge like oatmeal, has a nutty flavor and is good topped with a little honey.


Of course it wouldn't be fall without the local parasol mushrooms The aigamo in the field hunting for the day. Time to bring in the green onions, don't know if the late season black corn will make it all the way. Mr.Brown is very happy when I cover the duck run with fresh weeds. So are the aigamo who leave presents every day. Summer is over and gone are these nasties, yama-biru, ヤマヒル、mountain leeches.







summer feasting





These guys snuck in and got my good row of late season corn.



4 comments:

  1. Oh, so THAT is amaranth! I've seen that around here and wondered what it was. Duh.

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  2. Looking good there, as always. I wanna do Amaranth; wish shrooms grew like that here; glad there's no monkeys here; those eggs look very familiar, and so does Mr. Brown.

    I finished reading "The Last American Man". By the end of the Book Conway was really annoying me, and actually my favorite part of the book was towards the front where the author includes accounts of American men in the early days and the historical bits on tried Utopias.

    Jumping around in "The Omnivore's Dilemma" now, while also reading "One Man's Wilderness". Proenneke's writing is so clear.

    Cheers,

    ken

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  3. Abudaiyo, did you plant the amaranth or is it wild?

    Ken, glad you are enjoying the books. I would've liked to have bumped into Conway on the Appalachian Trail in NY, must have been a sight.

    I think the amaranth is super easy, but yields are low, so far. The grain seems to be pest free as compared to anything else , so far. Moths have totally decimated some entire plants leaves but the grain is intact.

    john

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  4. No, it's stuff I see around. In other people's fields.

    I guess it has generally been sidelined as a crop coz it is fiddly to harvest in huge quantities. Like those ancient wheat varieties that simply drop their grain when they are ripe. Easy to gather up on a small (hunter/gatherer) scale but no use to the huge corporations that want to reap in tons of the stuff (and then hold the rest of the world to ransom).

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