Saturday, August 13, 2011

Feast or famine



Haven't been all the way up the road in a while and haven't swam here for even longer
it's a real interesting place. The trout are unafraid and the giant アブ abu horeseflies weren't biting.





The insects were certainly feasting on my corn and cornstalks, lost a good many. The damaged ones go to the ducks who are certainly not as upset as I am.







5 fingered black corn














giant



4 varieties of maize this year. Only one F1 hybrid.






keep in mind these are not all supermarket jumbo sized, in fact few are. Most are medium to smallish this year. Had some pollination problems I believe. That and the usual laziness.










drying nicely in the fishnet, the cherry tomatoes didn't fare well for sundries though



a first- sprouting on the cob









bumper beans and chard

3 comments:

  1. Hey Johne !

    Nice work there.

    I planted some of that "late season" black corn early this year, too, and some of it is sprouting like yours. It's a heirloom corn from a friend of mine, Katou-san. Actually, the best time to plant it is right now, and then harvest in late fall. (It won't bolt like it does in summer.) I was thinking, since the stuff is unbelievably robust, and we've got a super long growing season here in Japan, maybe we could do two plantings in one season from the same seed ?

    I'm gonna give it a go.

    ken

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  2. Hi Ken,

    I planted some of Katou-heirloom early but only a dozen or so took?? I did however get 100 in late and they're goin good. The black 5 fingered plant in my pic is heirloom from Noguchi/Tanet co. starchy but good. Did you ever de-husk your dried kernals before grinding to make your tortillas? Drying is going real real slow in our climate. 2 plantings sounds good to me. It's jaga time again!

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  3. Hello, I found your blog at shizennou blog spot. Very interesting blog that you have. I was wondering if you know that Masanobu Fukuoka's farm is still around and if his family are still letting people stay at their farm to learn natural farming?

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